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20130201
20130228
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KQED (PBS) 8
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Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> pporalso comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it looked like a scene from a movie, but it was all too real. a meteor came crashing down to earth today, triggered a fireball over russia, and sent people running for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> rorter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show
for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it looked like a scene from a movie, but it was all too real. a meteor came crashing down to earth today, triggered a fireball over russia, and sent people running for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> reporter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show until it suddenly explodes 30 miles above the earth. the city of chelyabinsk was unlucky to be beneath the meteorites flight path and was showered with debris dropping from the sky. thousands of windows were smashed, shocked workers evacuated their offices. this school class is about to be interrupted by the shock wave. here the windows come crashing in, and a national judo squad runs for cover. c
. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: with just a week left before automatic spending cuts are set to begin, the obama administration stepped up pressure on republicans in congress today. the latest warnings came over the potential impact that furloughs would have on air trav, starng in apl. transportation secretary ray lahood said travelers could face new delays of 90 minutes at major airports in chicago, new york and san francisco. more than 100 air control towers at smaller airports could be closed, lahood said. airlines likely would cancel flights. and c
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: there may be hope yet for bringing the national epidemic of obesity under control. at least, the latest numbers on calories and fast food, released today, indicated possible progress. for years, health officials have warned about americans' growing girth. now, research from the centers for disease control and prevention suggests the fight against fat may be having an effect. among the findings: american children consumed fewer calories in 2010 than a decade before-- 7% less for boys and 4% less for girls. and for adults, fast food accounted for just over 11% of the calories consum
... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: there may be hope yet for bringing the national epidemic of obesity under control. at least, the latest numbers on calories and fast food, released today, indicated possible progress. for years, health officials have warned about americans' growing girth. now, research from the centers for disease control and prevention suggests the fight against fat may be having an effect. among the findings: american children consumed fewer calories in 2010 than a decade before-- 7% less for boys and 4% less for girls. and for adults, fast food accounted for just over 11% of the calories consumed in 2010, down from nearly 13% in 2006. the researchers acknowledge the changes are small and can't be fully explained. but public campaigns against obesity have intensified in recent years. last september, for instance, new york city's board of health limited sugared drinks and sodas to 16 ounces or less. mayor michael bloomberg praised the prohibition t
of the schools used. it will air on pbs february 28. 26 degrees out. still ahead, funeral services will be held for the former new york city mayor. good morning. get up and get going. a lot of us bleary-eyed after super bowl. 5:11 is the time. a kind of chilly day. clipper headed our way to bring another dusting of snow. adam, can you just take all of these and make them into one big >> we[no audio] hear adam. i know the answer was yes. these temperatures for you, we waking up to 23 degrees in washington. germantown, 24 this morning. 23.mbia is we will have increasing clouds someghout the day after morning sunshine. between 34mperatures and 38 degrees. we do have a warm up on the way. .r details on that dusting coming up in just a few minutes. try to regain audio his so we can hear thoughts and feelings on the upcoming snow. in the meantime, we will go to traffic. >> thank you so much. for our early birds hitting the , good. no problems to report. a quiet start. i hope it stays that way. good morning to our nation's capital. no problems to report. , making thevenue trip into virginia -- north o
documentary "cliff-hanger" on pbs takes us behind the scenes of the fiscal cliff drama on capitol hill. let's take a look at a clip. >> these guys are going into the meeting with the president. boehner has just been humiliated by his own people with the plan "b" debacle. and he tells harry reid to go [ bleep ] himself. >> harry reid looks up and he says, what? excuse me? and boehner says it again. >> hey, listen. senator reid and i are close friends. we've got to work together. but just like any close friends, sometimes you just need to clear the air. and we did. >> i can't imagine that happening. >> oh, gee. oh, that's never happened on capitol hill before, has it, michael? >> i was talking about between us. that's okay. >> that would never happen. so michael, take us behind the scenes. here i suspect pass is going to be prologged several times in the future. >> well, exactly right. when i look forward to the state of the union address tomorrow night, i'm looking forward to seeing john boehner and joe biden sitting behind barack obama, especially after what i learned in the last six months
of -- lot of news about this issue. in january, pbs's "nov a" had a documentary called "rise of the drones," and last week's "time" magazine cover carried the same title, and, of course, the administration's use of drones for targeting terrorists to con cronet our war on terrorism has come to be a central issue in the confirmation hearing of the proposed cia directer, the nominee, john brennan. however, privacy issues and military applications of uas beyond the scope of this hearing. i use the term "unmanned aircraft systems" or usa instead of uas or drones because it is a more complete term. uas are complex systems made up of not just aircraft, but as well as supporting ground, air, and communications infrastructure. uas comes in a variety of shapes and sizes and carries out a wide range of missions. aviation has come a long way in a relatively short period of time thanks to american innovation and i think newty. the list of pioneers in aviation and aerospace is very long. you may not know the details of the achievement, but i'm shore you know names like cesna, james mcdonald and donald d
a certain way. >>> in a new pbs documentary, samberg says women have a long way to go but also do men. >> my brother-in-law once said he was baby sitting. i said, dude you're not baby sitting. you're the father. that's called fathering, parenting. that's not baby sitting. we need to live in a world where men do half women do half. >> facebook's chief operating officer wants to start a movement called lean in. some of the details were revealed last week by jodie cab tore of "the new york times." jodie, good morning. >> good morning. we should say this book is not out yet so people will have the opportunity to read it. what is cheryl sandberg trying to do? >> if you look at the fortune 500, only 21 ceos are female. so she wants to address that problem. she's telling women to lean in. if you want to understand her ideas, a very good preview is the ted talk she gave a year or two on this and her book will be out march 11. she basically wants women to become more aggressive and savvier about navigating the workplace. >> i think the issue is for many years it's been goi
. >> levar burton, leslie uggams, louis gosset jr., thank you very much. >> airing tomorrow night on pbs. >>> head coach john harbaugh, next. but first this is "today" on nbc. ♪ chances are, you're not made of money, so don't overpay for motorcycle insurance. geico, see how much you could save. >>> back now at 8:45. he is on top of the football world this morning. john harbaugh, head coach of the super bowl winning baltimore ravens is with us from baltimore this morning. coach, congratulations. >> thank you very much. it's great to be with you guys. >> a lot of people would start an interview asking about the game. i'm not going to do that. i'm going to ask about the power outage. what was going through your mind at that moment? >> just stunned. i looked up and i said i think the lights went out. it was really a great observation there. it was just crazy. we haven't seen that one before. that was new. >> coach, did that change the dynamic of this game? you were up 28-6. lights go out. all of a sudden it looks like the 49ers get second life there. >> it did change the whole complexion.
couldn't deny them intellectually. so i adopted them. >> all right. that was a clip from the pbs documentary "makers: women who make america. a film about the evolution of women's roles over the past 50 years. with us, the mother/daughter pair featured in the film, founding editor of "ms." magazine, letty pogrebin and writer abby pogrebin. thanks for being here again. >> thanks for having us. >> i look at that clip, and it's a generational thing. what was radical when you did that was actually pretty normal by the time i grew up. i'd see my dad sitting on the couch and go, can you get me a sandwich? everybody would turn to him and say, get it yourself! it wasn't that way. >> it was very radical at the time. i was working full time. so was he. yet i would come home and bake bread in order to make stuffing for the turkey. >> you didn't even think twice about it, did you? >> no. it just was some role i was born into. and when i became a feminist, i read myself into radicalism. i suddenly looked around and said, this is ridiculous. i can't justify it. and so my husband and i used to
help society of "frontline," the pbs program that many of us watch and respect, detailed one woman's story in great detail. but that wasn't an isolated incident. the national prison rape elimination commission, created by congress, has said -- quote -- "as a group, immigration detainees are especially vulnerable to sexual abuse and its effects while detained. the prison rape elimination act of 2003, known as prea, was designed to eliminate sexual abuse of those in custody. it was bipartisan, championed by the late senator ted kennedy and senator sessions of alabama and i cosponsored it. prea required promulgation of national standards to prevent, detect and respond to prison rape in america. there have been questions raised about whether those standards would apply to immigration detainees. and as i've said before, when we drafted and passed prea, it was our intent it would apply to all in federal detention, including immigration detainees. i was pleased when president obama issued a memo clarifying that prea applies to all federal confinement facilities and directing agencies to a
love this story. pbs front line, we'll see on you tough the president is whatever he says, they're going to call it divisive, right and he's a hater. whatever. they detailed rush did his recent budget battles with one scene taking a look at the speech. remember when the president eviscerated paul ryan's budget and paul ryan was there. he was talking about the proposal to privatize medicare. it says that 10 years from now if you're a 65-year-old eligible for medicare, you'll have to pay $6,400 more than you would today. instead of guaranteed health care, you'd get a voucher and if you can't buy insurance, tough luck. it ends medicare as we know it. ryan at the time called that a partisan broadside. seriously, jacki is there anything in there that's nasty or personal? >> no, but it's the screaming "you lie" at the state of the union is pretty nasty. every time you poke them in any way, it's a horrible attack of epic proportions and then they smack back, and they're like i don't know what you're to us. stephanie: right. according to the front line special, the administration offici
grimm of the "washington post" and cries teen bellantoni, political editor at the pbs "newshour." >> ryan, those response oregon this event are calling the event at the mall largest climate event ever. waiting for crowd counts. not sure if that's going to happen. the main purpose was to put the president on notice about the promises he made during his state of the union speech. how significant is this? >> i think it was a big deal. one of our reporters was down there, and she tells me it was huge, tens and tenses of thousands of people stretching from the washington monument to the white house. >> wow. >> and these are groups who are allied with the white house but are saying, look, enough of this. and they are not just asking for action to -- you know, to make the world a better place, to advance clean technology and grown energy, but they are saying let's stop destroying it also, you know. if obama opens up, you know, the arctic to oil drilling, that will be -- you know, that will be a democratic president doing something that reagan didn't even do, so they don't -- don't want
fatigue, town hall part two, and this week's must-reads. we have political editor of the pbs news hour christina bellantone, robert traynumb, a georgetown university dean, and ed rendell, an nbc news political analyst. hello. nice to see you here. >> hello, there. >> robert, let's go to the blame game fatigue. let's take a listen to the first question that governor bobby jindal was asked on "meet the press" today. >> local air traffic control is on the funding block with this sequestration. and you heard the secretary say this is real disruption because they've got to cut a billion dollars. >> you know, the president, and you heard right, compared the president to lincoln. we need real presidential leadership here. the president needs to stand up to the plate. >> governor jindal's first instinct was just to blame the president, not talk about his state, for example. i mean, why shouldn't the american public be frustrated about this? it seems like it's always pointingpoint ing fingers and nobody taking a mirror and turning it on themselves and saying here's where i can do better. >> you
public service announcements featuring big bird set to run on several pbs stations next week. >> no matter what your age, it's important to get your body moving every single day to help keep you healthy. >> look, mrs. obama, i'm getting moving right now by jogging. >> joining me now for more on this, is leah goldman with "marie claire" magazine. >> we've seen the first lady enlist rachael ray to dr. oz and how would you rate the success of it? >> it's been a successful platform for the first lady, impressively so, i would say. she's seen some really significant results, actually, and typically you see first lady adopt these platforms and they go on the road with them and they do appearances for them, and we've actually seen some effects of this tour. for example, she's going out to mississippi, and since she started this let's move campaign, mississippi has seen a 13% drop of childhood obesity rate and that is the heaviest state in the nation so that's pretty impressive. >> let's look at poll numbers on the first lady. a poll taken two months ago shows that 73% of americans a
he dances. >> gretchen: pbs ordered a four-week run with a movie set to premiere in the fall and air after "conan." will he have the baby? will the baby be part of his act? >> steve: that's what people love. looks like it will be him. >> brian: he'll be broadcasting in cable. meanwhile, the tooth fairy getting more nervous by the day. new going rate, generous, going right for baby teeth, it's not going to be easy. >> steve: and the president has been warning americans of the sequester for several scary weeks. >> a lot of people may not notice the full impact of the sequester, but this is going to be a big hit on the economy. >> steve: i tell you what, the guy who actually invented the sequester with some help from his colleagues on capitol hill say the president not being completely truthful. former senator phil gramm coming up next [ male announcer ] why is kellogg's crunchy nut so delicious? because every flake is double-toasted... splashed with sweet honey... and covered in rich double-roasted peanuts. mmm. [ hero ] yummy. [ male announcer ] kellogg's crunchy nut. it's super delic
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)